Campus Affairs & Student Engagement

Mensch’s Guide to Campus Activism

Guide to Campus Activism

A Mensch's Guide to Campus Activism
Connecting college students to worldly issues.

Contact

The Hillels of Illinois
Regional Programs
30 S. Wells St.
Chicago, IL 60606
phone: (312) 444-2868
fax: (312) 855-2479
email: hillel@juf.org

Lewis Summer
Intern Program
The Hillels of Illinois
30 S. Wells St.
Chicago, IL 60606
phone: (312) 444-2868
email: lsip@juf.org

College Blog

Hillel Blog

From Hillel to Health Professional

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by Lisette Dolgin

irina

Irina was involved with Hillel during her time as an undergrad at Loyola University Chicago.  As a sophomore, she chaired the Social Committee in hopes of bringing new and exciting ways for students to bond.  A driving force for connecting Loyola Hillel students to the cross campus community, Irina engaged her peers at events such as the Skate for Israel, Hookah in the Sukkah, and monthly get-togethers at different students' homes across Chicago.

Irina was particularly interested in offering pre-med and healthcare profession students a chance to interact with professionals in the field by hosting panels where professionals offered their insights.  Irina’s goal was to bring together pharmacists, physical therapists, doctors and nurses to help her and her peers in their career decisions. Irina was particularly interested in how healthcare professionals balance work and family life, "Each of these careers requires a large time commitment and some people, especially women, wanted to have a career in healthcare, but not take too much out of their family life."  Irina explained, "Since family is a huge Jewish core value, it was important for people in Hillel to be able to balance their love and passion for healthcare and their family." Irina will be graduating this year from Nursing school and looking forward to being able to return to Hillel and offer her advice to students on campus.

"I learned more in Hillel than I did my entire Jewish life," Irina went on to say, "because of my family roots from the FSU, my parents, growing up in the Soviet Union, were not allowed to practice religion. They were robbed of their knowledge of Judaism because they weren’t allowed to participate." Hillel served as Judaism 101 for Irina, and she brought back to her parents her newfound knowledge of their faith. "They looked to Hillel to teach me the significance of the holidays, or why we have certain traditions," Irina explained, "On top of that, they wanted me to see how important it is to have a Jewish family. Not just my own family, but friends, a community--it’s what the Jewish religion is all about."

Irina’s experience in Hillel helped prepare her for her career in Nursing. "Nursing is a field where you are a member of a team. Between all of the disciplinary roles, everybody comes together to take care of the patient.  Hillel taught me what it means to be part of a team, as a community, and how to work for a common goal.  From my Jewish education, I learned the importance of teamwork--a huge strength to have in the healthcare field."

Irina wants current students thinking about the medical field to know that they should stick to their passion and identity. "In medicine, you really have to love what you do. It's so important to come into work with a smile on your face. As a Jew, it’s important to stick to your roots, even if you’re not super involved. Stick to your culture and look where you came from and it will bring forth those values of hard work and commitment that truly make who you are."

Saerree K. Fiedler, major contributor to Northwestern’s Fiedler Hillel

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By Cindy Sher
Managing Editor
 
Saerree K. Fiedler, who along with her late husband, Louis, made possible the construction of Northwestern University’s Louis and Saerree Fiedler Hillel Center, passed away on April 14 at the age of 93. In addition to her instrumental work at Northwestern, Fiedler supported other Jewish charities in Chicago as well as in Israel. Fiedler was both a Silver and Golden Circle member of the Jewish United Fund of Metropolitan Chicago.

Saerree and Louis—who themselves dated while active at the University of Illinois Hillel during their college years—were always fond of Hillel and its mission of inspiring young Jewish adults to commit to Jewish life on campus and beyond.“Her care and passion for Hillel was infectious,” said Rabbi Michael Balinsky, the former executive director of Northwestern’s Fiedler Hillel. “There were no issues of personal kavod or glory with her. She did it because it made her feel good and she wanted to make a difference.”

Read more about Saerree Fiedler at JUF News.org 

Jewish population study to help in longterm planning

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The 2010 edition of the Chicago-area Jewish Population Study has begun. The studies, conducted every 10 years, provide both a snapshot and a roadmap for the Jewish community, telling us who we are, where we are, and where we’re headed.
A private research firm conducts the study by calling thousands of households throughout the Chicago area. Calls have begun and will continue for several months. All responses are completely confidential, and no personally identifiable details are linked to the answers. The stronger the response, the more reliable the information. So if you are called, please take the few minutes needed to participate. And spread the word so your friends, neighbors and colleagues know about this important study. Contact the Community Survey Hotline is (312) 357-4545 or get more information by e-mail, PopulationStudy@juf.org.

In a recent JUF News column, JUF Senior Vice President Jay Tcath noted that "learning who we are, where we live, how Judaism informs our life choices and what our needs and dreams are is what the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago gauges every decade. What we learn from these community surveys, supplemented with frequent service updates from our agencies, allows us both to regularly adjust and engage in longterm planning."