Don’t call me yenta

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Jewish celebrity gossip roundup along with some colorful commentary by Cheryl Jacobs.

Don’t call me yenta

Saying goodbye to Amy

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Saying goodbye to Amy photo 

It’s my inaugural blog post, but I feel obligated to write about death.  Not really how I envisioned starting off this blog.  When I decided to turn my interest – my boyfriend might call it an obsession – with Jewish celebrity gossip into something productive that I could use for work, I knew I’d come up with the perfect way to justify all the time I spend reading People.  Just don’t call me yenta.

As everyone by now has heard, troubled and talented British singer Amy Winehouse passed away this weekend and, while it might come as a shock to some, she was Jewish.  Her Jewish parents, Mitchell and Janis, raised Amy and her brother in Northern England.  Sarah Silverman once quipped, “She is Jewish, right?  If she isn’t, someone should tell her face.”  

She was also the same age as me – 27.  And though I’ve never tried any drugs – I barely can even stand taking Advil – I’ve always felt a certain kinship towards her. 

There was something so enthralling and innocent about Amy Winehouse and her beautiful jazz-filled voice that just pulled you in.  Perez Hilton, the king of celebrity bloggers and a friend of Amy’s, wrote on his blog about the legacy of Amy Winehouse, who paved the way for other British singers like Adele.  “Amy Winehouse was one of the sweetest people we have ever met, and it is such a tragedy that the world has lost such an incredible talent,” he wrote.  “And, what we hope for more than anything is… even if people didn't get to know the real Amy Winehouse, like we did, and fall in love with her and her childlike innocence… we hope that what people remember the most is her catalogue of timeless songs.”

While drugs seem the obvious villain here, today it was announced by police that the autopsy – which took place on Monday – has not established a cause of death.  Also, there have been reports that no drug paraphernalia was found in her home. 

Her dad, who was on a plane to New York at the time of her death, rushed back to London.  “Our family has been left bereft by the loss of Amy, a wonderful daughter, sister, niece. She leaves a gaping hole in our lives,” the family statement reads.  “We are coming together to remember her and we would appreciate some privacy and space at this terrible time.” 

Read an update on People.com.

Amy Winehouse, like other young, uber-talented musicians (Janis Joplin, Kurt Cobain), died too young, but her legacy will live on.  May her memory be for a blessing.